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7.62x54r Ammo History

One of the oldest military cartridges still in use, the 7.62x54mmR first entered service in Imperial Russia in 1891 along with the Mosin-Nagant bolt-action rifle. It stayed in front line infantry use throughout both world wars and the Russian Civil War; along with the Mosin, it was used in the SVT-40, the DP machine gun, and many other weapons. Today, it is still used in the Dragunov sniper rifle and the PKM general purpose machine gun. Due to the large number of Mosins exported to the US, it is a relatively popular round among American shooters.

Most 7.62x54mmR ammo fires a 150 or 180 grain projectile at a muzzle velocity of about 2,600 to 2,900 feet per second. This results in external ballistics comparable to those of other contemporary cartridges such as the .30-06 Springfield and .303 British. With appropriate soft point ammunition, this caliber is quite capable of taking most North American game, delivering both high diameter expansion and strong penetration. The bullets used for this caliber are frequently boat tailed. This reduces the effect of crosswinds on the point of impact, a notable asset for long distance shooting.

223 BRASS FOR SALE

Highest quality 223 brass for sale in America. Every step is made to give you the best 223 once fired rifle brass in an affordable manner.

Shooters who load their own 223/556 brass know that reliability and consistency is key.  The systems we employ provide you with the same high quality 223 brass time and time again.  We take 223 once fired brass and make the 223 brass casings as good as new again through an intricate and labor intensive process.

Our proprietary blend of polishers to give you the best finish possible. Once our machines are finished operating, we then hand inspect and package. All packages are over weighed to make sure you have more than enough if a few bad rounds are found.

Maine Ammo Company, provides loaders with top quality once fired brass in 223 / 556, polished brass and fully processed brass at affordable prices. Through economies of scale we pass savings on to you, while still performing the in depth attention to detail that is required for a professional loading operation. Whether its once fired brass for sale, polished brass for sale or processed reloading brass for sale, we have you covered.

1 lb – 74 cases estimate

44 MAG bulk ammo for sale

The .44 Remington Magnum, or simply .44 Magnum (10.9×33mmR), and frequently .44 Mag, is a large-bore cartridge originally designed for revolvers. After its introduction, it was quickly adopted for carbines and rifles. Despite the “.44” designation, guns chambered for the .44 Magnum round, and its parent, the .44 Special, use 0.429 in (10.9 mm) diameter bullets.
The .44 Magnum is based on a lengthened .44 Special case, loaded to higher pressures for greater velocity (and thus, energy). The .44 Magnum has since been eclipsed in power by the . Casull, and most recently by the .460 S&W Magnum and .500 S&W Magnum, among others; nevertheless, it has remained one of the most popular commercial large-bore magnum cartridges. When loaded to its maximum and with heavy, deeply penetrating bullets, the .44 Magnum cartridge is suitable for short-range hunting of all North American game—though at the cost of heavy recoil and muzzle flash when fired in handguns, less so in carbines and rifles.
The .44 Magnum cartridge was the end result of years of tuned hand loading of the .44 Special. The .44 Special, and other large-bore handgun cartridges, were being loaded with heavy bullets, pushed at higher than normal velocities for better hunting performance. One of these handloaders was Elmer Keith, a writer and outdoorsman of the 20th century

Elmer Keith settled on the .44 Special cartridge as the basis for his experimentation, rather than the larger .45 Colt. At the time, the selection of .44 caliber projectiles for handloaders was more varied, and .44 special brass was thicker and stronger than the dated .45 Colt case. Also, the .44 Special case was smaller in diameter than the .45 Colt case. In revolvers of the same cylinder size, this meant the .44 caliber revolvers had thicker, and thus stronger, cylinder walls than the .45. This allowed higher pressures to be used with less risk of a burst cylinder.
Keith encouraged Smith & Wesson and Remington to produce a commercial version of this new high-pressure loading, and revolvers chambered for it. Smith & Wesson’s first .44 Magnum revolver, the Model 29, was built on December 15, 1955, and the gun was announced to the public on January 19, 1956 for a price of $140. Julian Hatcher, (technical editor of American Rifleman) and Elmer Keith received two of the first production models. Hatcher’s review of the new Smith & Wesson revolver and the .44 Magnum cartridge appeared in the March, 1956 issue of the magazine. Smith & Wesson produced 3,100 of these revolvers in 1956.
By the summer of 1956, Sturm, Ruger became aware of this project and began work on a single action Blackhawk revolver for the new .44 Magnum cartridge. Popular rumor says a Ruger employee found a cartridge case marked “.44 Remington Magnum” and took it to Bill Ruger, while another says a Remington employee provided Ruger with early samples of the ammunition. Ruger began shipping their new revolver in late November, 1956.
The .44 Magnum case is slightly longer than the .44 Special case, not because of the need for more room for propellant, but to prevent the far higher pressure cartridge from being chambered in older, weaker .44 Special firearms, thus preventing injuries and possible deaths.
The .44 Magnum was an immediate success, and the direct descendants of the S&W Model 29 and the .44 Magnum Ruger Blackhawks are still in production, and have been joined by numerous other makes and models of .44 Magnum revolvers and even a handful of semi-automatic models, the first being produced in the 1960s. The film “Dirty Harry“, prominently featuring the S&W M29, contributed to that model’s popularity (as well as the cartridge itself).
Ruger introduced its first long gun, a semi-automatic carbine called the Ruger Model 44 chambered for .44 Magnum, in 1959. Marlin followed soon after with a lever action Model 1894 in .44 Magnum. Having a carbine and a handgun chambered in the same caliber is an old tradition; the .44-40 Winchester was introduced by Winchester in a lever action in 1873, and Colt followed in 1878 with a revolver in the same caliber. The .38-40 Winchester and .32-20 Winchester were also available in both carbines and revolvers, allowing the shooter to use one type of ammunition for both firearms.
Although improved modern alloys and manufacturing techniques have allowed even stronger cylinders to be made, leading to larger and more powerful cartridges such as the .454 Casull and .480 Ruger in revolvers the same size as a .44 Magnum, the .44 Magnum is still considered an exceptional weapon. In 2006, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the .44 Magnum, Ruger introduced a special 50th anniversary Blackhawk revolver, in the “Flattop” style

357 SIG bulk ammo for sale

The .357 SIG pistol cartridge (designated as the 357 Sig by the SAAMI and 357 SIG by the C.I.P. or 9×22mm in unofficial metric notation) is the product of SwissGerman firearms manufacturer SIG Sauer, in cooperation with American ammunition manufacturer Federal Cartridge. While it is based on a 10mm auto case shortened and necked down to accept 0.355-inch (9.0 mm) bullets, the .357 SIG brass is slightly longer than .40 S&W by 0.009 in (0.23 mm) to 0.020 in (0.51 mm) total. .40 S&W brass should not be used in a gun chambered for .357 SIG as it can cause damage to the firearm and serious injury or death to the shooter. The cartridge is used by a number of law enforcement agencies and has a good reputation of accuracy.
 
Developed in 1994, the new cartridge was named “357” to highlight its purpose: to duplicate the performance of 125-grain (8.1 g) .357 Magnum loads fired from 4-inch (100 mm)-barreled revolvers, in a cartridge designed to be used in a semi-automatic pistol with greater ammunition capacity than a revolver. Performance is similar to the 9×23mm Winchester.
Other than specialized competition cartridges like the 9×25mm Dillon (1988), which necked a 10mm Auto case down to a 9mm bullet, the .357 SIG (1994) was the first modern bottleneck commercial handgun cartridge since the early 1960s, when Winchester introduced a .257 caliber round based on the .357 Magnum, the now obsolete .256 Winchester Magnum (1960). Then Remington introduced the unsuccessful .22 Remington Jet (1961), which necked a.357 Magnum case down to a .22 caliber bullet, and the .221 Remington Fireball (1963), a shortened version of their.222 Remington. Soon after the .357 SIG, other bottleneck commercial handgun cartridges appeared: the .400 Corbon (1996), necking the .45 ACP down to .40 caliber; the .440 Corbon (1998), necking down the .50 AE to .44 caliber; the .32 NAA (2002), necking the .380 ACP down to .32 caliber; and the .25 NAA (2004), necking the .32 ACPdown to .25 caliber.

.300 WSM ammo for sale

.300 Winchester Short Magnum (also known as .300 WSM) is a .30 caliber rebated rim bottlenecked center fire short magnum cartridge that was introduced in 2001 by Winchester. The .300 WSM cartridge overall length is 72.64 mm, cartridge case is 53.34 mm in length and the bullet diameter is .308 in (7.62 mm), which is common to all U.S.A  .30 caliber cartridges. The principle at work in the .300 WSM short magnum cartridge is the advantage of fitting larger volumes of powder in closer proximity to the primer’s flash hole, resulting in more uniform, consistent ignition. In field use, the .300 WSM round mirrors the performance of its older counterpart, the .300 Winchester Magnum, which is based on a modified.375 Holland & Holland belted magnum casing.
The advantage to the .300 WSM round is ballistics that are nearly identical to the .300 Winchester Magnum, but in a lighter rifle with a shorter action. A disadvantage of cartridge case designs with relatively large case head diameters lies in relatively high bolt thrust levels exerted on the locking mechanism of the employed firearm. Also in small ring actions the larger chamber diameter removes more steel from the barrel tenon making it weaker in a radial direction .

300 AAC Blackout ammo for sale

.300 AAC BlackoutSAAMI short name 300 BLK, also known as 7.62×35mm is a rifle cartridge developed in the United States by Advanced Armament Corporation (AAC) for use in the M4 carbine. The .300 BLK purpose is to achieve ballistics similar to the 7.62×39mm Soviet cartridge in an AR-15 platform while using standard AR-15 magazines at their normal capacity.
 
While 5.56×45mm NATO has enjoyed widespread acceptance in military circles, the nature of the missions encountered by some special operations groups often demand a round that provides better performance than that available in the high-energy standard velocity rounds and subsonic performance greater than standard 9mm (the ubiquitous pistol round also commonly used in many SMGs.
In an effort to satisfy this need, the .300 AAC Blackout was developed. The .300 BLK can be seen as a SAAMI-certified version ofJones’ Wildcat .300 Whisper. The .300 AAC Blackout was created by Advanced Armament Corporation in cooperation with Remington Defense, under the direction of AAC’s Research and Development Director Robert Silvers and with the support of the company’s founder, Kevin Brittingham.
The .300 BLK project’s goals were:
  • Create a reliable compact .30-caliber solution for AR platform
  • Use existing inventory magazines while retaining their full capacity
  • Create the optimal platform for sound and flash suppressed fire
  • Create compatible supersonic ammo that matches 7.62×39mm ballistics
  • Provide the ability to penetrate barriers with high-mass projectiles
  • Provide all capabilities in a shorter, lightweight, durable, and low recoiling package
Meeting these goals allowed the development team to negate many of the perceived drawbacks inherent to other large caliber cartridges when used in the M4 platform. Colt Firearms and other arms makers had previously chambered AR-pattern rifles and carbines in various .30 caliber rounds but several issues were encountered. In the case of the 7.62×39mm, its relatively severe case angle caused feeding issues unless specially modified AK-47 magazines were used, and even then results were less than outstandingModified bolts were also needed owing to its larger case head diameter. Rounds such as the 6.8 SPC and 6.5 Grendel had similar part-interchangeability issues but did allow for the use of the standard M4/M16 30-round magazine albeit with a reduced capacity.

7.62×39 ammo for sale

The 7.62×39mm round is a rifle cartridge of Soviet origin that was designed during World War II. The 7.62x39mm was first used in the RPD. Due to the worldwide proliferation of the SKS and AK-47 pattern rifles, the 7.62x39mm cartridge is used by both militaries and civilians alike. 7.62×39mm ammunition is purportedly tested to function well in temperatures ranging from −50 to 50 °C (−58 to 122 °F) cementing its usefulness in cold polar or hot desert conditions.
The 7.62×39mm cartridge was influenced by a variety of foreign developments, including the German Mkb 42(H) and the U.S. M1 carbine.
Shortly after the war, the world’s most widespread military-pattern rifle was designed for this cartridge: the AK-47. The 7.62x39mm cartridge remained the Soviet standard until the 1970s, and is still one of the most common intermediate rifle cartridges used around the world. It was replaced in Russian service by the 5.45×39mm cartridge, which is used by the current-issue AK-74 and its variants.

308 Winchester ammo for sale

The .308 Winchester (pronounced: “three-oh-eight” or “three-aught-eight”) is a rimless, bottlenecked rifle cartridge and is the commercial cartridge from which the 7.62×51mm NATO round was derived. The .308 Winchester was introduced in 1952, two years prior to the NATO adoption of the 7.62×51mm NATO T65. The (308) Winchester branded the 308 cartridge and introduced it to the commercial hunting market as the .308 Winchester. Winchester’s Model 70 and Model 88 rifles were subsequently chambered for the new 308 cartridge. Since then, the .308 Winchester has become the most popular short-actionbig-game hunting cartridge worldwide. It is also commonly used for civilian target shooting, military sniping, and police sharpshooting. The relatively short case makes the .308 Winchester especially well-adapted for short-action rifles. When loaded with a 308 bullet that expands, tumbles, or fragments in tissue, this cartridge is capable of high terminal performance.
Although the 308 is very similar to the military 7.62×51mm NATO specifications, the .308 cartridge is not identical, and there are special considerations that may apply when mixing these cartridges with 7.62×51mm NATO, and .308 Winchester chambered arms. Their interchange is, however, considered safe by the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers Institute (SAAMI).

40 S&W ammo for sale

The .40 S&W (10×22mm Smith & Wesson in unofficial metric notation) is a rimless pistol cartridge developed jointly by major American firearms manufacturers Smith & Wesson and WinchesterThe .40 S&W was developed from the ground up as a law enforcement cartridge designed to duplicate performance of the Federal Bureau of Investigation‘s (FBI) reduced-velocity 10mm Auto cartridge which could be retrofitted into medium-frame (9mm size) semi-automatic handguns. It uses 0.40-inch (10 mm) diameter bullets ranging in weight from 105 to 200 grains (6.8 to 13.0 g).

 
In the aftermath of the 1986 FBI Miami shootout, in which two FBI special agents were killed and five wounded, the FBI started the process of testing 9×19mm Parabellum and .45 ACP ammunition in preparation to replace its standard-issue revolver with a semi-automatic pistol. The semi-automatic pistol offered two advantages over the revolver: 1) increased ammunition capacity and 2) increased ease of reloading during a firefight. The FBI was satisfied with the performance of its .38 Special +P 158 gr (10.2 g) L.S.W.C.H.P. (lead semi-wadcutter hollow point) cartridge (“FBI Load”) based on decades of dependable performance. Ammunition for the new semi-automatic pistol had to deliver terminal performance equal or superior to the .38 Special FBI Load. The FBI developed a series of practically oriented tests involving eight test events that they believed reasonably represented the kinds of situations that FBI agents commonly encounter in shooting incidents.[citation needed]
 
During tests of the 9×19mm and .45 ACP ammunition, the FBI Firearms Training Unit’s Special Agent-in-Charge John Hall decided to include tests of the 10mm cartridge, supplying his personally owned Colt Delta Elite 10mm semi-automatic, and personally hand loaded ammunition. The FBI’s tests revealed that a 170–180 gr (11.0–11.7 g) JHP 10mm bullet, propelled between 900–1,000 ft/s (270–300 m/s), achieved desired terminal performance without the heavy recoil associated with conventional 10mm ammunition (1,300–1,400 ft/s (400–430 m/s)). The FBI contacted Smith & Wesson and requested it to design a handgun to FBI specifications, based on the existing large-frame S&W Model 4506 .45 ACP handgun, that would reliably function with the FBI’s reduced-velocity 10mm ammunition. During this collaboration with the FBI, S&W realized that downsizing the 10mm full power to meet the FBI medium velocity specification meant less powder and more airspace in the case. They found that by removing the airspace they could shorten the 10mm case enough to fit within their medium-frame 9mm handguns and load it with a 180 gr (11.7 g) JHP bullet to produce ballistic performance identical to the FBI’s reduced-velocity 10mm cartridge. S&W then teamed with Winchester to produce a new cartridge, the .40 S&W. It uses a small pistol primer whereas the 10mm cartridge uses a large pistol primer.
 
The .40 S&W cartridge debuted January 17, 1990, along with the new Smith & Wesson Model 4006 pistol, although it was several months before the pistols were available for purchase. Austrian manufacturer Glock Ges.m.b.H. beat Smith & Wesson to the dealer shelves in 1990, with pistols chambered in .40 S&W (the Glock 22 and Glock 23) which were announced a week before the 4006. Glock’s rapid introduction was aided by its engineering of a pistol chambered in 10mm Auto, the Glock 20, only a short time earlier. Since the .40 S&W uses the same bore diameter and case head as the 10mm Auto, it was merely a matter of adapting the 10mm design to the shorter 9×19mm Parabellum frames. The new guns and ammunition were an immediate success.
 
The .40 S&W case length and overall cartridge length are shortened, but other dimensions except case web and wall thickness remain identical to the 10mm Auto. Both cartridges headspace on the mouth of the case. Thus in a semi-auto they are not interchangeable. Fired from a 10mm semi-auto, the .40 Smith & Wesson cartridge will headspace on the extractor and the bullet will jump a 0.142 inches (3.6 mm) free bore just like a .38 Special fired from a .357 Magnum revolver. If the cartridge is not held by the extractor, the chances for a ruptured primer are great. Smith & Wesson does make a double-action revolver that can fire either at will using moon clips. A single-action revolver in the .38–40 chambering can also be modified to fire the .40 or the 10mm if it has an extra cylinder. Some .40 caliber handguns can be converted to 9mm with a special purpose made barrel, magazine change, and other parts.
 

223 Remington and 5.56 NATO ammo for sale

The .223 Remington (.223 Rem) is a cartridge with almost the same external dimensions as the 5.56×45mm NATO military cartridge. The name is commonly pronounced either 223, two-two-three or two-twenty-three Remington. It is loaded with a 0.224-inch (5.56 mm) diameter jacketed bullet, SP or “ green tip” with weights ranging from 40 to 90 grains (2.6 to 5.8 g), though the most common loading by far is 55 grains (3.6 g). The 223 external case dimensions are very similar, the .223 Remington and 5.56×45mm differ in both maximum pressure and chamber shape. The 223 and or 5.56 maximum and mean pressures for some varieties of the 5.56 (different cartridge designations have different standards) exceed the SAAMI maximum for the .223 Remington, and the methods for measuring pressures differ between NATO and SAAMI.[3] The 5.56 chamber specification has also changed since its adoption, as the current military loading (NATO SS-109 or US M855) uses longer, heavier bullets than the original loading. This has resulted in a lengthening of the throat in the 5.56 chamber. Thus, while .223 Remington ammunition can be safely fired in a rifle chambered for 5.56×45mm NATO, firing 5.56 ammunition in a .223 Remington chamber may produce pressures in excess of even the 5.56 specifications due to the shorter throat.

9mm Ammo For Sale

The 9×19mm Parabellum (abbreviated 9mm, 9mmP, 9×19mm or 9×19) cartridge was designed by Georg Luger and introduced in 1902 by the German weapons manufacturer Deutsche Waffen- und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) for theirLuger semi-automatic pistol.The 9 MM for this reason, it is designated as the 9mm Luger by the SAAMI[ and the 9 mm Luger by the C.I.P. Under STANAG 4090, it is a standard cartridge for NATO forces as well as many non-NATO countries.
The name (9 MM) Parabellum is derived from the LatinSi vis pacem, para bellum (“If you seek peace, prepare for war”), which was the motto of DWM.
According to the 2006 edition of Cartridges of the World, the 9 MM 9×19mm Parabellum is “the world’s most popular and widely used military handgun cartridge. The 9 MM in addition to being used by over 60% of police in the U.S., News week credits the 9 MM 9×19mm Parabellum pistol sales with making semiautomatic pistols more popular than revolvers. The popularity of the 9 MM cartridge can be attributed to the widely held conviction that it is effective in police and self-defense use. The 9 MM low cost and wide availability contribute to the caliber’s continuing popularity.

45 ACP Ammo For Sale

Designed by John Browning in 1904, the .45 ACP is an effective combat pistol round, combining accuracy and stopping power. Used in the Colt .45 pistol, the .45 ACP round was used by the US Army in 1911. The ACP stands for Automatic Colt Pistol, the .45 ACP is known for having low muzzle flash and blast and moderate recoil. Maine Ammo Company stocks a wide range of 45 ammo to satisfy the needs of plinkers, hunters, competitive shooters, and the avid ammunition aficionado. Being avid shooters ourselves, we enjoy trying out new 45 ACP ammo and try to offer you 45 ammo at very aggressive prices so that you can share in our most favorite pastime. when in a Maine Ammo store or online, ask about our 45 ACP “bad boy” round. This 45 ACP round will shock you.